Linux Makes Waves in the Cloud Gaming Industry

Cloud technology may now be a ubiquitous force in the business world, but it is important to keep in mind that not all clouds are created equal.

Cloud technology may now be a ubiquitous force in the business world, but it is important to keep in mind that not all clouds are created equal. Different architectures can serve one organization well, while another model doesn’t fulfill those needs as nicely. For cloud gaming, the Linux operating system may be the platform of the future. 

As Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin noted at LinuxCon and CloudOpen North America, Valve launched its Steam Web platform for Linux in February. The company also uses the operating system for building its source code, animation and information assets, Linux.com reported. Valve co-founder Gabe Newell suggested that this is not an uncommon setup for video game developers.

The same motivations that are inspiring companies to utilize Linux game servers have also made open source a popular model. Visibility over the code that creates an operating system and the ability to configure it according to specific needs offer developers the freedom to build tools they need, often at a lower cost than they could otherwise. 

“The center of gravity has shifted from console hardware platforms with price and access controlled by PC makers, to web-based free-to-play and massive multiplayer online games,” wrote Linux.com contributor Libby Clark. “As a result, businesses are investing in developers and services and users are the focus of market development strategies.”

Is the industry ready for cloud gaming?

Cloud gaming offers many benefits to publishers, developers and consumers. However, Doki Tops, CEO of cloud gaming platform provider Kalydo, recently asked whether the gaming industry is ready to take advantage of the technology. For example, the popularity of massive multiplayer online games (MMOGs) has surged in recent years. Despite avid interest from consumers, the delivery mechanisms have remained stagnant. The process usually involves a large download, followed by patches to the game. Each of these processes can take hours, even for people with fast Internet connections.

“For consumers new to MMO games (and used to the convenience and quick access of Mobile and Social), the whole process is off-putting,” Tops wrote. “For veteran players it’s a painful procedure that erodes any willingness to try unknown titles. All in all a situation best described as frustrating.”

Tops suggested that a more effective model would be to utilize cloud technology in conjunction with compression and prediction algorithms to drastically shorten time-to-delivery and make it easier for customers to access and try out new products.

Is the industry ready for cloud gaming?

Cloud gaming offers many benefits to publishers, developers and consumers. However, Doki Tops, CEO of cloud gaming platform provider Kalydo, recently asked whether the gaming industry is ready to take advantage of the technology. For example, the popularity of massive multiplayer online games (MMOGs) has surged in recent years. Despite avid interest from consumers, the delivery mechanisms have remained stagnant. The process usually involves a large download, followed by patches to the game. Each of these processes can take hours, even for people with fast Internet connections.

“For consumers new to MMO games (and used to the convenience and quick access of Mobile and Social), the whole process is off-putting,” Tops wrote. “For veteran players it’s a painful procedure that erodes any willingness to try unknown titles. All in all a situation best described as frustrating.”

Tops suggested that a more effective model would be to utilize cloud technology in conjunction with compression and prediction algorithms to drastically shorten time-to-delivery and make it easier for customers to access and try out new products.

Brain Brafton loves and lives technology. A big data geek and an information retrieval junkie he consumes, analyses, interprets and process data like he was a machine. On a continual learning iteration his believe life is a journey not a destination. To keep in contact with Brain find him on Google+ or on Twitter